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He has been through every kind of engagement imaginable against rebels to the U.

Halo: Contact Harvest - Joseph Staten - Google книги

An alcoholic spec-ops solider with no family and a bad attitude named Staff Sargent Avery, Johnson, has been assigned to stop pirates in the outer rim. Along with him his partner Nolan Byrne have been sent to raise a militia to stop the rebels. When Johnson finds out that the rebels are actually a deadly alien covenant that wants to destroy mankind. The Covenant are invading Harvest an outer edge farming colon He has been through every kind of engagement imaginable against rebels to the U.

The Covenant are invading Harvest an outer edge farming colony and the U. Halo: Contact Harvest promises readers that if you like Johnson you are going to learn more about him and you are going to like him more. I couldn't agree with that anymore the book started in a different atmosphere not usually associated with Johnson. He was not hooah and bullets he was depressed from mourning his aunt who had passed away and it really helps you appreciate his character more. A theme that commonly reoccurred to me was "When you are down you have to get up and help because there are people who depend on you.

If sci-fi is not your piece of cake or just war books in general then you should just avoid this book because it has of both and plenty. Jul 20, Jon Cole rated it really liked it. I've read a nearly embarrassing amount of books set within video game franchises and it's safe to say that this is the best one so far. Like most other Halo books, the weakest element of this novel is the disparate yet loosely connected parallel storylines centered on different characters.

Clearly, Staten needed to cover a lot of ground with this prequel to the VG series, but the short sequences with unfamiliar characters detracted from the pacing to some extent.


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Aside from that, however, Contact I've read a nearly embarrassing amount of books set within video game franchises and it's safe to say that this is the best one so far. Aside from that, however, Contact Harvest succeeds on quite a few levels. Staten manages to characterize and humanize Sergeant Avery Johnson, who had only been loosely defined in Halo. He manages to write a story about the series's classic "rampant AI", an aged construct who exhibits human-like tendencies and god complexes.

Furthermore, he produces a moment with these AI that is far more emotionally cathartic than any other moment of "robot love". Ultimately, Contact Harvest proves to be a book that I wouldn't be embarrassed to recommend to friends who are interested in the Halo franchise. Staten's first novel is not only well written, but adds a fair amount of much needed context and infrastructure to the sometimes silly aspects of a video game story.

Shelves: since-joining-goodreads , I really shouldn't be surprised but then again, I always set myself up for these things. I don't want to say the book is written poorly because writer Joseph Staten is actually quite talented.

Halo : Contact Harvest

His universe building skills, as shown in the second Halo game, for example, are excellent. His problem: the universe he's built is boring and as confusing as shit.

I rem I really shouldn't be surprised but then again, I always set myself up for these things. I remember really liking Halo 2 at first.

HALO: Contact Harvest: HALO, Book 5

I felt the writers really expanded a universe that was mostly a rip off of Aliens in the first place. Halo 2, while an underrated game story-wise the Covenant sections are interesting though not compelling , was definitely a mess. They lost track of their hero and focused on aspects that were made so utterly confusing and deep that, well, it wasn't fun. And let's not get started on Halo 3, in which they had to a continue this craziness established in Halo 2 and b erase all the terrible mistakes from Halo 2 in some exposition-heavy way to make Halo 3 a bit more accessible to newbies of the XBox and to the now critically mixed franchise.

I always ignored the books because I always found myself more frustrated with Halo's mythology as oppossed to drawn to it.


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Also, I was shocked that despite the Halo franchise being one of my all-time favorites in the video game world, I was very unattached to it emotionally. I liked Master Chief but he is a very thin hero. He's cool but is he lovable. There was Cortana. I know Halo 3 told me but. I still don't really know. And then there was the tricky Arbiter, who, himself, is a mythological symbol that makes you want to tear your eyeballs out. He was cool and I liked his missions in Halo 2 but.

The main three characters were really devoid of anything other then COOL moments. And the Halo games outside the Master Chief vein were pretty unbearable. I didn't even finish Halo Wars and I will probably skip Halo: Reach since it is a prequel and prequels, especially loaded with anti-climaxes, dense mythologies, and, once again, none of the original characters, just sounds like crap on a stick. So I think I just explained why I skipped the Halo books! I don't want to read about this universe that is confusing and dense and has no emotion behind it.

But, somehow, I bought two Halo books.

I initially bought Contact Harvest because it had Sgt. Avery Johnson on the cover. Now this was interesting to me for two reasons. You cared for him when he was there. And, naturally, they fucking killed him at the end of Halo 3. Figures the first main character, of sorts, to die would be black! But in the video game, Johnson was an Apone-rip-off who was kind of fun. But as I started to read his story in Contact Harvest, which is a prequel by the way, I instantly regretted it.

Some people, who are rip-offs of other caricatures in the first place, can't be made three dimensional. Johnson is a drill sgt who says witty things and shoots stuff. It's all kind of sad really. And now that I've read Johnson in all kinds of different situations outside of mindlessly shooting elites.

I don't like him anymore. Johnson is no longer interesting to me now because he is OVER written now. The rest of the book doesn't help much considering half of it is about Covenant politics. And the writer fails to let the story flow. It's really distracting and annoying. It is not exaggeration when I say this book really could have been pages shorter.

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But pesky Joseph Staten can't let us turn the page without knowing how the Elites had a war once or how Sgt. Johnson masturbated once when he was 14! Plus there is this inane subplot involving an Unggoy the little creatures for the Covenant and a flying creature called a Huragok and their friendship even though both, to facilitate the narrative of future games, must die.

Really bad. I am seriously questioning reading the second Halo book I bought. I'd advise to ignore this one if possible. I always ignored the books because I always found myself more frustrated with Halo's mythology as opposed to drawn to it. Johnson is a drill Sgt who says witty things and shoots stuff. Oct 01, Apribbernow rated it it was amazing. The majority of this book takes place on the planet Harvest, after Avery Johnson fails to follow the order to shoot an insurrectionist because there were too many civilians around, and was sent there to train the police who volunteered to become the only force on the planet to fight the insurrectionists.

There are various destinations around Harvest that this book takes place such as the space station orbiting Harvest, the base that the training occurs on and the main hall where all of Harvest's festivities occur. The situation on Harvest is about to get much more dire than even Staff Sergeant Avery would have predicted when the Covenant invade. Sergeant Johnson deals with many different problems internal and external. Most of the story takes place on planet and there is very few things in the time or placing of events that affect the story except the brief skirmish that was in outer space and caught Avery and Brynes off guard because they were not used to shooting a gun in a zero-gee environment and were flung around the ship at first.

The main idea of this story is to keep fighting even though the odds may say that you are doomed because the people on this planet are constantly fighting against steep odds. The enemy they are fighting outnumber us and are much more technologically advanced than us. The people that are volunteering to fight against the insurrectionists have to look fear in the face everyday in this story because they are actually going to end up fighting a threat that seems impossible to be defeated.

I would recommend this story to any other person that is a fan of the Halo series, like me, or also anyone who enjoys reading science fiction especially if they enjoy a lot of fast paced action with good descriptive words and a rich back story to the Halo story that I have come to love as more than just the video game series but also as the book series.

Aug 10, Jarno VA rated it it was amazing. Halo always had a special place in my heart.

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It all started when my father bought the xbox for the release of Halo 3. Of course I got to play too, and my 9 year old self was immediatly sold. It might've been the weapons, it might've been the thrill to "explore" the new world, anyway I sticked to it through my entire child- and teenhood. It has accompanied me many days, playing every game on legendary over and over again, cursing at the online matchmaking and wasting precious time as my parents Halo always had a special place in my heart.

It has accompanied me many days, playing every game on legendary over and over again, cursing at the online matchmaking and wasting precious time as my parents would say. After a couple of years, I reach my 18th birthday and I get this trilogy bundle as a present, which contained Contact Harvest, Cole Protocol and Ghosts of Onyx. And I can tell you one thing for sure, it was definitly not a waste of time.

The Halo universe has grown so much on me and I am truly relieved this book is as good as I hoped it would be. I love the way of storytelling, it creates a wonderful backstory for Avery Johnson, someone who I admired through the games, you get to see the war from the Covenant's side of view, the ascension of the Prophets, rampancy of A.

It's a book I would highly recommend for anyone who shows interest in the Halo series, especially of you have already played the games.